The only relationship Facebook really cares about: Your data and those who will pay them for it.

Facebook continues to use UX design for mild acts of evil. This is their latest ploy to take your information that was once private and expose it to the world

Yesterday, something I said on Twitter seems to have resonated. “It takes a court order to get your personal data from Twitter, but just anyone can get it from Facebook.”

Many people skim read (at best) or don’t read at all (at worst) messages about changes to terms of service like this. They just click the “I accept” or “Allow” button, trusting that an application or service has their best interests at heart. To make sure its users fully understand the implications of clicking “Allow”, Facebook should disable that button until a user confirms that they have read and understand what all this really means for them, their children and their privacy.

(via Hardly your grandmother’s Facebook New User Object fields – stuffandnonsense.co.uk)

UPDATED 18.01.2011

Facebook has reigned back this new ‘feature’. Or as el Reg puts it: ‘Developers kicked back out of your undie drawer’

The social network suspended the feature, introduced on Friday, after only three days. The decision follows feedback from users that the sharing of data process wasn’t clearly explained and criticism from security firms that the feature was ripe for abuse.

(via Facebook suspends personal data – theregister.co.uk)

The Facebook post on the matter calls the mass of negative press and warnings from security experts ‘useful feedback’.

Over the weekend, we got some useful feedback that we could make people more clearly aware of when they are granting access to this data. We agree, and we are making changes to help ensure you only share this information when you intend to do so. We’ll be working to launch these updates as soon as possible, and will be temporarily disabling this feature until those changes are ready. We look forward to re-enabling this improved feature in the next few weeks.

(via Improvements to Permissions for Address and Mobile Number – developers.facebook.com)

Such bullshit.

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